Taking Inventory – Which Agency Of Government Should We Trust?

Bush And Saudi KingIn all seriousness, in the face of the laughable question I’ve posed in the headline above, let’s make a little list here and see what we have remaining in the way of which federal government entities are worthy of our trust:

1)  The FBI:  Diana West wrote yesterday that retired Senator Bob Graham of Florida is demanding a reopening of the investigation into strong evidence which directly links the Saudi Arabian government to providing financial and logistical assistance for the 9//11/01 terrorists – the same ones who killed 3,000 Americans in one terrible day. 

Graham says that the FBI covered up the information (probably at the order of George W. Bush, I’ll guess here) and is still stonewalling the release of the evidentiary records.  Why?  To protect our government’s deep entanglements with the Saudis (and the jihad movement) from public scrutiny.  That’s why.  We’re in bed with the enemy.

My Vote:  NOT TRUSTWORTHY

2)  The Secret Service:  What can I say here?  Read this.

My vote:  NOT TRUSTWORTHY

3)  The Central Intelligence Agency:  If one looks at this agency’s failures to sound the alarm and stop numerous terrorist attacks, the Boston Marathon bombing and the 9/11/01 attacks come to mind, not to mention that the current head of the CIA, John Brennan, has been credibly identified as a convert to Islam, how can we place any confidence in it?

My vote:  NOT TRUSTWORTHY

4)  Department of Homeland Security:  Taking a quick scan of DHS Director Janet Napolitano’s words and actions, which appear to be at odds with her responsibilities, and not in the best interests of protecting America’s citizens, DHS gets my thumbs down.

My vote:  NOT TRUSTWORTHY

5)  National Security Administration:  Don’t make me laugh.  I’m not in the mood for it.

My vote:  NOT TRUSTWORTHY

6)  ATF:  Looking at the Fast and Furious operation, which has long ago been burried under countless scandals and other distractions, the fact that three ATF administrators were promoted, despite revelations that they were deeply involved in the running of guns to Mexican drug cartels – firearms that were used to kill an American Border Patrol Officer and countless Mexican citizens –  is more than enough for me.

My vote:  NOT TRUSTWORTHY

7)  Department of State:  Read this and this.

My vote:  NOT TRUSTWORTHY 

8)  Congress:  Here’s a sickening morsel for you.

My vote:  NOT TRUSTWORTHY

9)  The Pentagon:  All service training manuals have been scrubbed clean of rerences alluding to Islam’s ties to jihad and terrorism.  No one remaining in the Pentagon from the 9/11/01 days has a clue as to the true identity of the enemy.  Most higher-ups have been replaced by Islam apologists or sympathizers.

My vote:  NOT TRUSTWORTHY

Obama And Abdullah10)  The President of The United States:  All of the above comes directly back to this man.  I could write a book about this prevaricating, sinister fellow, Barack Hussein Obama.  Suffice it to say that there is more than enough hard evidence to cast the ballot:

My vote:  NOT TRUSTWORTHY

I’ll stop the litany right here.  If any of my readers still has confidence in any branch of our federal government en toto, feel free to leave your supporting evidence in the comments section below. 

My vote:  NOT TRUSTWORTHY

About John L. Work

John Lloyd Work has taken the detective thriller genre and woven an occasional political thread throughout his books, morphing what was once considered an arena reserved for pure fiction into believable, terrifying, futuristic, true-to-life “faction”. He traveled the uniformed patrolman’s path, answering brutal domestic violence calls, high speed chases, homicides, suicides, armed robberies, breaking up bar fights, and the accompanying sporadic unpredictable moments of terror - which eventually come to all police officers, sometimes when least expected. He gradually absorbed the hard fact that the greatest danger a cop faces comes in the form of day-to-day encounters with emotionally disturbed, highly intoxicated people. Those experiences can wear a cop down, grinding on his own emotions and psyche. Prolonged exposure to the worst of people and people at their worst can soon make him believe that the world is a sewer. That police officer’s reality is a common thread throughout Work’s crime fiction books. Following his graduation from high school, Work studied music and became a professional performer, conductor and teacher. Life made a sudden, unexpected turn when, one afternoon in 1976, his cousin, who eventually became the Chief of the Ontario, California, Police Department, talked him into riding along during a patrol shift. The musician was hooked into becoming a police officer. After working for two years as a reserve officer in Southern California and in Boulder, Colorado, he joined the Longmont, Colorado Police Department. Work served there for seven years, investigating crimes as a patrolman, detective and patrol sergeant. In 1989 he joined the Adams County, Colorado Sheriff’s Office, where he soon learned that locking a criminal up inside a jail or prison does not put him out of business. As a sheriff’s detective he investigated hundreds of crimes, including eleven contract murder conspiracies which originated “inside the walls”. While serving on the Adams County North Metro Gang Task Force and as a member of the Colorado Security Threat Intelligence Network Group (STING), Work designed a seminar on how a criminal’s mind formulates his victim selection strategy. Over a period of six years he taught that class in sheriff’s academies and colleges throughout Colorado. He saw the world of crime both inside the walls and out on the streets. His final experiences in the criminal law field were with the Colorado State Public Defender’s Office, where for nearly two years he investigated felonies from the defense side of the Courtroom. Twenty-two years of observing human nature at its worst, combined with watching some profound changes in America’s culture and political institutions, provided plenty of material for his first three books. A self-published author, he just finished writing his tenth thriller.
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One Response to Taking Inventory – Which Agency Of Government Should We Trust?

  1. Caroline beckenhaupt says:

    It’s all too dispiriting: which is partially the goal, no doubt. I am very disturbed by the thought of Russian troops on our soil. What an insult to all the men who gave their lives for this country. Except that today’s America is not the one they sacrificed themselves for.

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